Randex

Tuesday 18 November 2014
Andy Robertson, Wired UK

With Jonathan Irons’ Atlas Corporation influencing the warfare of the future with its technology, Advanced Warfare questions the role of the private sector in warfare, politics and diplomacy. As with the character of Atlas in the original Bioshock, the Atlas Corporation refers back to Ayn Rand’s novel Atlas Shrugged, and in the same way that earlier game explored the themes of Rand’s work Advanced Warfare highlights the belief that elected politicians are a barrier to creating a rational, ordered world.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 18 Nov 2014
Matt Rozsa, Salon

What’s particularly noteworthy about these observations, aside from their definitiveness, is the fact that virtually no one adhering to a mainstream Western political ideology would disagree with them. Could you conceive of anyone on the left, right, or middle arguing that they’d accept being forced to live for another’s sake or want another to live solely for their own? Or that their ambitions are not driven by a desire to beat others? Or that they don’t think success comes from seizing on opportunities? Or that they think majorities should be able to vote away the rights of minorities?

These statements are platitudes, compellingly worded rhetorical catch-alls with inspiring messages that are unlikely to be contested when taken solely at face value.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 18 Nov 2014
Monday 17 November 2014
John Paczkowski, Re/code

“Comcast Shrugged”? Sounds Like the Worst Ayn Rand Book Ever. Mark Cuban: “If Ayn Rand were an up and coming author today, she wouldn’t write about steel or railroads, it would be net neutrality.”

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 18 Nov 2014
Swati Sharma, New Indian Express (Chennai)

Fountainhead,

by Ayn Rand.

I read this book when I was in high school and it filled me with a sense of grandeur and purpose. Howard Roark is a monolith of integrity.

About the book.

This instant classic is the story of an intransigent young architect, his violent battle against conventional standards, and his explosive love affair with a beautiful woman who struggles to defeat him. This edition contains a special Afterword by Rand’s literary executor, Leonard Peikoff which includes excerpts from Ayn Rand’s own notes on the making of ‘The Fountainhead’.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 18 Nov 2014
Ivo Vegter, Daily Maverick

In her influential 1957 book, Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand posited the notion that productive industrialists, bowing under the weight of socialist government and welfare statism, might one day decamp and set up business on their own, in some hidden enclave. The rest of the world, which had claimed a moral right to the redistribution of the wealth created by the producers, collapsed, while the producers themselves thrived in isolation. The idea: producing the means to live is both necessary and deeply moral. Taking that production away from the producer, or enslaving them, is inherently immoral.

To what extent we agree with this sentiment is not today’s topic.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 18 Nov 2014
Steve Kovach, Business Insider

The theory goes that allowing companies to pay for these so-called “fast lanes” will hurt innovation and allow big companies to keep getting bigger. Cuban compared that to the same kind of government regulation that nationalized the railroads in Ayn Rand’s famous novel “Atlas Shrugged.”

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 17 Nov 2014
Joshua Rivera, Entertainment Weekly - PopWatch

Jonathan Irons is pretty much Frank Underwood from House of Cards without the accent. He runs the Atlas Corporation—a private military company with a name so Randian it’s not even a spoiler—and smooth-talks you into his employ.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 17 Nov 2014
Andrew Boschert, Pitt News (U of Pittsburgh)

…BioShock consistently explores themes such as racism, sexism, religion and morality. The first game even satirically eschews the philosophies of Ayn Rand — the antagonist in the game is a strict follower of laissez-faire economics — right around the time of her return to political discourse.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 16 Nov 2014
Leah Finnegan, Gawker
Neutral  

…the Baby Name Critic was sent this chart, from the Randian Costco of websites, Vox.com.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 17 Nov 2014
Sunday 16 November 2014
The Associated Press, Gaston Gazette (Gastonia, NC)
Positive  

Thought for Today: “The upper classes are merely a nation’s past; the middle class is its future.” — Ayn Rand, Russian-American author (1905-1982).

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 16 Nov 2014
Tamar Rotem, Ha'aretz (Israel)

Many young Israelis of the post-Yom Kippur War period were enthralled by [Moshe] Kroy’s assertive, lucid explication of Rand’s philosophy of objectivism. But he soon moved to Australia, adopted and discarded spiritual practices at a breakneck pace – from Scientology via exorcism and Buddhism to gnosticism – until a breakdown, a tempestuous divorce, a fatal shooting and a suicide claimed him not long after his 40th birthday, 25 years ago.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 16 Nov 2014
Mike Rivage-Seul, OpEdNews

…how should Catholics express their love for the poor? Clearly not by endorsing the dynamics of the free market Ryan and his real mentor, Ayn Rand, lionize. In the “Joy of the Gospel” (JG) – published a year ago at this time – the pope identifies the unfettered markets so dear to Rand’s and Ryan’s hearts (along with their “trickle-down” ideologies) as homicidal (JG 53), ineffective (54) and unjust at their roots (59). He sees “each and every human right” (including education, health care, and “above all” employment and a just wage (192) as intimately connected with “defense of unborn life” (213).

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 16 Nov 2014