Randex

Monday 02 February 2015
Reema Moudgil, New Indian Express (Chennai)

I remember being given Rs 20 by my grandmother on my birthday and buying The Fountainhead. I read in it integrity and  passion for a life…I remember being given Rs 20 by my grandmother on my birthday and buying The Fountainhead.

I read it without being aware of the capitalist subtext or the glorification of materialism. I read in it integrity and passion for a life purpose, a memorable love story and a new insight into architecture that gave me a lifelong love for design and living spaces. It also taught me that success is not about winning admiration but being true to yourself, no matter what the cost. Till date, I am not swayed by the derision Ayn Rand evokes in a certain section of intelligentsia. She crafted the writer in me. And in the end, a book is about what we take from it.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 03 Feb 2015
Paul Constant, The Stranger - The Slog (Seattle, WA)

Back in the late 1920s, as Ayn Rand was working out her philosophy, she became enthralled by a real-life American serial killer…

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015
Clover Hope, Jezebel

The strangest part of the profile is the description of Wilson’s Ayn Rand-inspired management style, which an ex-store-manager calls “a little brainwash-y.” It certainly sounds cultish…

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015
Gustavo Lopez, Talon Marks (Cerritos College, Norwalk, CA)

For the most part, society is always crying out against suffering of the poor with a trendy hashtag or slogan but when it comes right down to it, no one wants to give up their money and time to help. This selfish, “Atlas Shrugged” mindset is what keeps society separated. The rich have always been taxed in order to supplement government programs and not always reluctantly. It’s nothing new under the sun, it’s just that we’ve fallen into this trap of “big government being evil,” when in reality it has helped more often than it has been detrimental.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015
Michael Lind, Salon

The intellectual heroes of economic libertarianism—Milton Friedman, Ludwig von Mises, Friedrich von Hayek and, for some, Ayn Rand—did not consider themselves conservatives. On the contrary, they all rejected conservatism…

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015

Wilson told Canada’s National Post Business Magazine that he named his company Lululemon because he thought it was funny that Japanese people had trouble pronouncing the letter “L.” Wilson also spoke out over use of child labor in the Third World, in favor of the practice. An avid Ayn Rand fan, as chairman, he printed the name John Galt, the star of one the author’s books, on the company’s bags, without informing the company’s CEO.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015
Positive  

“The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren’t enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for man to live without breaking laws.” - Ayn Rand, 1957

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015
John Seward, Yahoo Finance
Mixed  

Wilson, who according to the NYT is enamored with the writings of Ayn Rand and the motivational seminars of the Landmark Foundation, said he will now turn his attention to his family’s new clothing business called Kit & Ace, while investing in Vancouver real estate.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015
David Boaz, Townhall.com

Rand’s books first appeared when no one seemed to support freedom and capitalism, and when even capitalism’s greatest defenders seemed to emphasize its utility, not its morality. It was often said at the time that socialism is a good idea in theory, but human beings just aren’t good enough for socialism. It was Ayn Rand who said that socialism is not good enough for human beings.

Her books garnered millions of readers because they presented a passionate philosophical case for individual rights and capitalism, and did so through the medium of vivid, can’t-put-it-down novels. The people who read Ayn Rand and got the point didn’t just become aware of costs and benefits, incentives and trade-offs. They became passionate advocates of liberty.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015
Victor W. Hwang, Forbes

…let’s take the ideas of writer Ayn Rand. Rand argued that rational selfishness is a virtue. She felt that morality that is not rational diminishes life and happiness. Rand has experienced a popular boomlet in recent years. Many politicians and business leaders have embraced her ideas. Liberals, for their part, have readily accepted her as a foil. Again, a simple binary choice.

But Rand’s ideas don’t fit the reality I work in. They bifurcate the world too cleanly.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015
Katie Halper, Raw Story

Happy 110th birthday, Ayn Rand! Born Alisa Zinov’yevna Rosenbaum, in Saint Petersburg, Rand wrote The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged, founded Objectivism, and helped give rise to the Libertarian and Tea Party movements, though she would certainly be mortified to see some of the people (i.e. all the religious ones) who her attribute their political beliefs to her ideology. To celebrate the guru of selfishness, let us look at scary quotes which range from denouncing altruism as evil to warning against female presidents.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015
Indian Express (Mumbai)

Ayn Rand who shot to fame with her two best-selling novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged was born on February 2, 1905. Rand advocated reason as the only means of acquiring knowledge and rejected faith and religion. She supported rational and ethical egoism, and rejected altruism. Her movement was called Objectivism and she went on to publish magazine and essay collections on the same. Her works are still popular and relevant. Here’re 16 of her best quotes…

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Feb 2015