Randex

Tuesday 23 December 2014
  1. Atlas Shrugged: Who Is John Galt?”: There is hope for bipartisanship — objectivists and progressives alike could agree that this shoddy, amateurish closer to the Ayn Rand trilogy was an utter embarrassment.
Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
David Mills, Patheos

More on Miss Rand, covered earlier in Ayn Rand As Some People Have (Alas) Never Seen Her, this supplied by the leftist site AlterNet: David Akadjian supplies Ayn Rand’s Christmas cards. She apparently actually sent out Christmas cards but no examples survive, so Akadjian supplies a few suggestions.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
Patrick Kidd, The Times (London)

Policy Exchange, the think-tank, is launching a new club next month: the Crossbench Film Society, which will show movies chosen and introduced by a politician. Sajid Javid, the culture secretary, is first up on January 12. Sadly, instead of one of his beloved Star Trek films, Javid has gone for the 1949 adaptation of The Fountainhead, by the right-wing moralist Ayn Rand.
By chance, The New Yorker has a piece this month imagining that the humourless Rand wrote reviews of children’s films. They include Snow White (“An industrious young woman neglects to charge for her housekeeping…

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
Tony Adler, Chicago Reader
Neutral  

Hedda Gabler at Writers Theatre: “Up there with—and maybe beyond—the best I’ve seen… . [Kate] Fry’s Hedda is by turns a proto-Ayn Rand, a sexual obsessive out of an August Strindberg script, a small-time Borgia, a wry Beckettian fool.”

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
Michael Winship, Raw Story
Negative   HUAC  

According to the media archival website Aphelis, “Among the group who produced the analytical tools that were used by the FBI in its analysis of ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ was Ayn Rand.”

“Abbott and Costello Meet Ayn Rand” – what a comedy horror picture that would have made.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
Doug Porter, San Diego Free Press

Jerry Sanders, former mayor, former police chief, currently CEO of the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce.

His deeds on behalf of greed and avarice also merit an autographed copy of Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged.

Whether it was housing for the poor, clean air for children in the barrio or decent wages for working people, Jerry Sanders was the man in 2014 leading the effort to squelch those aspirations.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
Negative  

Coming from Mike Judge, the comedy nailed the jargon of the startup scene (the chorus line of pitchers claiming “We’re social, mobile, and local,” “We’re mobile, local, and social”) and the chilly, Randian hubris of tech moguls envisioning a paradise of driverless cars and automated personal islands.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
Bill Hudson, Pagosa Daily Post

A humorous article posted to the website Alternet.com posed the question: Did Ayn Rand send Christmas cards?

Many of our readers may be familiar with author and philosopher Ayn Rand from her best-selling books, The Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957), and for her pro-Capitalist philosophical system which she called ‘Objectivism.’

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
John Lawrence, San Diego Free Press

I was startled into wakefulness by the ghost of Ayn Rand, she the author of the Virtue of Selfishness and sundry other solipsistic tomes.

Unlike Scrooge, she is not the least bit repentent. She told me of her new concept of Country Club America. Not everyone deserves to be a member. It’s sort of a metaphysical walled community in which some people get to join; others are left out. Only the Best, the Brightest and the Most Beautiful can be members.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
Evening Standard (London)

The objectivist Mr Javid.

Culture Secretary Sajid Javid continues to immerse himself in the arts. Next month he hosts the first evening of the new Westminster Film Club, at Policy Exchange HQ.

Javid’s chosen film is 1949’s The Fountainhead, after Ayn Rand’s book. So is he a big fan of Rand, the Russian-US novelist and thinker who believed in rational selfishness, ie that one “exist for his own sake, neither sacrificing himself to others nor sacrificing others to himself”?

The Londoner asked a representative why Javid had picked the film — he teased that “more would be revealed” that evening. Its story, however, may hold clues. Its main character, architect Howard Roark, rejected an industry of boredom and tradition (Javid was a banker) for a life of creativity and art. Sound familiar?

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
David Mills, Patheos

Ayn Rand was an awful, awful human being. Had she not become a guru, she would have had no friends, or been the kind of person no one likes who still accumulates a few admiring followers, whom she would banish for the slightest deviation from total devotion — a particularly mean Mean Girl. But you never know why someone is as he is and if with the same experiences you would have done as badly or worse.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014
Robert Tracinski, The Federalist

In laying out the ideas that I would most like readers on the right to learn from Ayn Rand, I realized one of the most important items was “a third alternative in the culture wars.”

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Dec 2014