Randex

Monday 06 October 2014
Rolling Stone

The first film to face Travers’ scorn is the third installment of sci-fi/drama trilogy Atlas Shrugged, the film adaptation of Ayn Rand’s 1957 literary opus. Travers “(lets) this one off easy” at Number 10 since at least “there’s no more of this crap” in the pipeline.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 03 Oct 2014
Seeking Alpha
Positive  

The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me. - Ayn Rand

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 03 Oct 2014
Iain G. Foulds, National Post (Toronto)

It is an insult to all Canadians that our government robs us the freedom to make our own economic decisions — whether buying groceries or television shows. It is an insult to all Canadians that our government violates the freedom of businesses to make their own economic decisions — whether selling groceries or television shows. To quote the immortal John Galt of Ayn Rand’s novel Atlas Shrugged when asked by government bureaucrats what they could do to help, he said, “Just get the hell out of the way.”

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 06 Oct 2014
Sunday 05 October 2014
Savannah Morning News
Positive  

…we could do great things, too!” “I’m living in Ayn Rand’s worst nightmare.” “With crime the way it is, here’s a suggestion: Use all three police chief candidates! One for the southside, one for the…

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 05 Oct 2014
rgantibully, Daily Kos
Negative  

What do the events in Ferguson, economic disparity, non-labeling of GMOs, racial discrimination, abusive professional football players, and environmental problems all have in common? This diary is a continuation of a series having to do with why Ayn Rand and the Tea Party will fail America.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 05 Oct 2014
Giulio Prisco, Crypto Coin News

The discussions of cryptography on the list were informed by a strong Libertarian stance that was characteristic of the early phase of Extropy, similar to the philosophy of Ayn Rand’s hero John Galt. The ideological framework is outlined in Max More’s “The Principles of Extropy,” and the following passages are especially relevant…

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 05 Oct 2014
Haim Shine, Israel Hayom

Students divided into camps, following one of two professors who offered polar opposite responses to the horrors of war. One group followed Dr. Moshe Kroy, who preached pure, absolute egoism: Everyone had to look out for himself and let whatever happened, happen. The theory of egoism from the school of Ayn Rand, author of “Atlas Shrugged,” held a certain charm for the soldiers who had paid a terrible price for the failures of the leadership elected to represent us all. Belief in the leaders was broken, and everyone had to draw his own conclusions. Things got to the point where students were charging to copy their notes, even friends who were absent due to extended reserve duty.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 05 Oct 2014
Clay Evans, Daily Camera (Boulder)

Boehner, of course, is just spouting the same twisted, Ayn Randian “maker” vs. “taker” brand of social Darwinism now inexplicably embraced by millions of conservatives. It’s just nasty, brutish Calvinism in an economic context: If you are poor or unemployed, it’s evidence that you deserve to be poor or unemployed — the economic gods hate you.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 03 Oct 2014
Robin Abrahams, Boston Globe
Negative  

Your hosts’ Ayn Randian approach to hospitality is surely the result of some traumatic hosting experiences. Think of the weekend as a kind of narrative scavenger hunt: Your assignment is to ferret out every horror story your hosts have about the advantage-taking, laundry-making, wake-and-baking guests of weekends past.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 04 Oct 2014
Saturday 04 October 2014
Herbert W. Stupp, City Journal

A “significant portion of the libertarian movement believes in anarchy,” writes Yaron Brook of the Ayn Rand Institute. “Anarchy” here does not mean chaos and Molotov cocktails in the streets; rather, it connotes a political philosophy favoring the absence of government. Brook favors the more moderate approaches of Nobel Prize-winning economists such as Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman, who understood the need for limited government.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 04 Oct 2014
David Rooks, Rapid City Journal (SD)

As a freshman at Mount Marty, I lay lounging in the dayroom of Whitby Hall after basketball practice one mild October evening. Soon, Brooklyn’s own hyperkinetic Andrew Bernstein, a senior Philosophy major, came shucking and jiving into the room (it was the 70’s). Bernstein immediately challenged me: “So – whattayagonnabe whenyagrowup? he snarled. I really hadn’t given it much thought. “I don’t know – political science … a lawyer, maybe.” The Jewish hoopster bent over as if punched. After a quick “I’ll be right back,” he flew to his room on the third floor and was back in a minute. No soapbox handy, a little out of breath, A. Bernstein stepped on a chair (I kid thee not.) In one hand he gripped a copy of Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged…”

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 03 Oct 2014
Amelia Urry, Grist

I get it: Oceans are cold and weird and not really relevant to you. You probably look forward to Shark Week, along with the rest of the internet, but how many of the other 51 weeks of the year do you spend thinking about elasmobranchs and their role in ocean health? And, let’s be real, you probably assume people who do are up there with Ayn Rand fans in the ‘taking themselves too seriously’ club. But the fact is that the climate movement that brought more than 300,000 people to New York City last month didn’t get there by talking about parts per million and polar bears…

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 03 Oct 2014