Randex

Friday 17 October 2014
Richard Sharkey, The Town Talk (Alexandria-Pineville, LA)

…"Future Shock,“ which seems to have influenced Wright as much as fellow Republican Paul Ryan was influenced by the Ayn Rand novel "Atlas Shrugged.”

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
Alex Bertsch, Dakota Student (U of ND, Grand Forks)

Ayn Rand was an awful human being. That’s just an indisputable fact. However, it seems even to this day there are feeble minded people who still try to preach her message of objectivism, or as I like to call it, being a selfish prick. One group that likes to propagate these ideals of selfish actions that result in the benefit of all of mankind, because of reasons, is the Ayn Rand Institute. The Ayn Rand Institute likes to give out free copies of the mediocre authors “great works” (and that’s a very liberal use of the word great) to help further the message of objectivism by instilling it in the minds of the children of America.

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
Jason Best, TakePart
Neutral  

…the bold red-and-black color palette, blocky type, and preponderance of five-pointed stars in the corporate design scheme may oddly call to mind the proletariat uplift of revolutionary Russian posters circa 1920—but the “inspirational” agitprop posted above the tables are more in the spirit of Ayn Rand than Karl Marx. One quote printed on the restaurant’s wall, from Helen Gurley Brown, read “The only thing that separates successful people from the ones who aren’t is the willingness to work very, very hard!” What on its face can seem a gung-ho celebration of American entrepreneurial spirit look far more grim when considered in light of Jimmy John’s recent run-ins with its employees.

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
Tim Koechlin, Huffington Post
Negative  

…I can’t believe that anyone over the age of 14 takes Ayn Rand seriously.

…Republicans and their Tea Party/Randian fringe are aggressively and enthusiastically pushing in the wrong direction.

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
Shama Rangwala, rabble.ca

…well as libertarians. His philosophical hero is Ayn Rand and sees himself in Howard Roark, her version of the ideal man – a freedom-fighter, powerful and superior. He compares pot-smokers to Jews as…

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
Kris Mauren, Acton Institute

If I’m not mistaken, we first met the night of January 16, 1986. That date wasn’t coincidental, Leonard and I were introduced at a private showing of an uncut, unedited 3.5 hour Italian version of Ayn Rand’s We the Living which had just surfaced more than forty years after Mussolini had ordered it destroyed.

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
Nick Farrell, Fudzilla
Negative  

In 2012 the lefty organisation pushed for a dramatic change in the minimum wage – they wanted $20 per hour minimum wage, even for the most basic jobs. It was a good lefty platform and one, which in the US, most sane people who do not sacrifice owls to the ghost of Ayn Rand could probably get behind.

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
Hank Stuever, Washington Post
Neutral  

Between the “Why is This Still a Thing?” reports on Miss America report and Ayn Rand, it’s as if John Oliver and company are going through old issues of Spy magazine to find their material.

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
Robert Tracinski, The Federalist

If I’m starting to sound like an Ayn Rand novel—well, bingo. This is precisely what Levin fails to understand about the individualist wing of the right. What they see in her writings is her appreciation for the world of work. Specifically, Ayn Rand realized that the production of wealth is about way more than the pursuit of animalistic appetites. It’s about thinking and creating. It’s not about defying the “constraints” imposed by nature, but about learning and respecting them. As Francis Bacon put it, “Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed.”

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
James Tennent, The Independent (London)
BioShock   Negative  

The story itself often feels like it has elements of BioShock in space – if you continued with the Ayn Randian themes, this is the sort of free-for-all society that hard-core libertarians think is some kind of basic human nature, it’s porn for people who think the Wild West was a majestic time without government intervention.

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
Geoff Pevere, Globe and Mail (Toronto)

…Emery is also a guy with a history of self-interested hucksterism that goes all the way back to dubious childhood practices in the schoolyard trade of comic books and stamps. In a kind of right-wing suburban Southern Ontario mutation of left-wing 1960s activist performance art political principles, Emery’s lightning-rod moment came when he first read the uber-individualistic mysticism of Ayn Rand and finally saw the universe clearly. And darned if he wasn’t at the centre of it.

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 17 Oct 2014
Thursday 16 October 2014
John Grindrod, The Guardian (London)

High Rise by JG Ballard (1975).

It’s Lord of the Flies in a tower block. This novel, in which the wealthy residents of a luxurious Barbican-like tower descend into savagery, has haunted me since I first read it as a teenager. I think of it as the fatalistic second act to Ayn Rand’s bombastic The Fountainhead.

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 15 Oct 2014