Randex

Sunday 21 September 2014
Robert Moore, The Ledger (Lakeland, FL)

I asked if he thought peddlers should be allowed to sell heroin on our campus the way vendors sell hot dogs on the streets of New York. He thought for a few seconds and then replied, “I’d have to say ‘yes.’?” Clearly Ayn Rand has made her mark on this generation. I could sense more than a whiff of self-congratulatory Ayn Rand libertarianism in my opium- and heroin-friendly student.

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 21 Sep 2014
Stewart Baker, Washington Post

My wife and I recently saw Atlas Shrugged, Part III (AKA, Atlas Shrugged: Who is John Galt?), the third and final movie in the trilogy based on Ayn Rand’s famous novel. Unfortunately, it was so bad that there isn’t much point to going over its weaknesses at any length. The acting was mostly wooden, the production values were little better than those of a 1950s B movie, and the villains are so ludicrously incompetent and stupid (much more so than in the book), that it becomes impossible to take them seriously. I thought the first movie in this series was merely mediocre, and the second was actually pretty decent. The third is so ridiculously bad, however, that it almost negates whatever was good in the first two.

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 21 Sep 2014
Saturday 20 September 2014
Oliver Burkeman, The Guardian (London)

Roman Krznaric, author of the recent book Empathy (he’s in favour of it), thinks that “outrospection” – the deliberate effort to seek out other people’s experiences – might help solve everything from inequality to climate change. Has Bloom been converted to the ramblings of Ayn Rand? Did he get out of the wrong side of bed? Actually, I think he might have a point.

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 19 Sep 2014
Mick Brown, The Telegraph (London)

The seed of Thiel’s libertarian beliefs was sown at Stanford. He founded a student newspaper, The Stanford Review, and co-authored a book, The Diversity Myth, attacking political correctness on campus. And he read and Ayn Rand, the eccentric Russian author whose advocacy of ferocious laissez-faire capitalism, and her celebration of the heroic, individualistic genius fighting against bureaucratic regulation, made her something of a patron saint…

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 19 Sep 2014
NFL Insider

…having a recent injury history that reads like an Ayn Rand novel, Bradshaw has looked like the most complete and dangerous running back in Indianapolis so far this season.

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 20 Sep 2014
Austin Price, Baeble Music

Patti Smith made it cool to bum around subways dressed in rags and reading shitty French poetry and writing overwritten pap like Just Kids, and Bruce Springsteen got some weird notion in his head about being some kinda poet of the streets. Before you knew it bands like Rush were thinking it was cool to write long-winded prog-rock rants about Ayn Rand novels.

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 20 Sep 2014
Lazygamer
BioShock  

Bioshock captured the essence of what made System Shock 2 so damned good, and placed it in a new setting. Rapture, was very much a character itself. Constructed as an idealistic society for a an elitist group of scientists, artists and industrialists, the Ayn Rand idealism is no more…

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 20 Sep 2014
Jag Bhalla, Big Think

What artists glamorize or ghettoize matters. Glamorizing childishness, however useful it is within art, can be disastrous in life. Perhaps TV’s complex (“awful…but…cool”) monstrous hero-villains help normalize elite abuses. Here’s how Ayn Rand “glamorized” free-marketeers. Here’s an example of nonconscious status associations shaping self-ghettoizing racial attitudes.

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 20 Sep 2014
Ari Armstrong, The Objective Standard

That Salon has again published an attack on Ayn Rand is no surprise; many on the left are obsessed with attacking Rand—a trend that indicates the growing cultural influence of her ideas. At least the latest such attack, written by CJ Werleman, is not nearly as nasty as are previous Salon articles; however, Werleman still misrepresents Rand’s ideas and thus attacks a straw-man.

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 20 Sep 2014
Simon Black, Zero Hedge

If you’re searching through your favorite news feed right now wondering why you haven’t heard of Directive 10-289, it’s because the law is fictitious. It’s part of the story from Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged.

At that part in the book, the economy was in a full blown crisis.

The government had engineered one emergency after another, and their only idea to ‘fix’ things was to award themsleves even more power and control over the economy… specifically to freeze everything in place.

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 19 Sep 2014
Friday 19 September 2014
Derek Donovan, Kansas City Star (MO)

I spoke to a reader this morning who was pretty upset that the film “Atlas Shrugged: Who Is John Galt?,” based on Rand’s most-acclaimed novel, wasn’t listed in the “Now Showing” grid of movies in the FYI section.

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 19 Sep 2014
Ottawa Citizen

The day Parliament reconvened, Minister of State for Small Business and Tourism Maxime Bernier took to social media to announce, “I’m finally on twitter.” The MP for Beauce posted a friendly shot of himself in front of a bookcase in his office. Prominently displayed on one shelf behind the pro-business, small-government minister was a wooden sign bearing the words: JOHN GALT.

Posted almost 5 years ago Publication date: 19 Sep 2014