Randex

Tuesday 08 July 2014
Mixed
Times of India

Deva Katta came heavily on movie reviewers the other night. The director, apparently tweeted a question in the midnight on his micro blogging site. ‘I wonder why so many people are still reading and analyzing “Atlas Shrugged” (A book written by Ayn Rand) after all the following verdicts when it was published’, he said, giving reviews of various magazines and critics at that time.

Of course, everyone rubbished off Atlas Shrugged. Some called it as a novel written out of hate and Time magazine asked if it is a novel or a nightmare. Despite all this huge criticism, this book of Ayn Rand stood out as a classic. Now what point Deva Katta wants to tell by using this example?

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 08 Jul 2014
Monday 07 July 2014
Negative
Orlando Delogu, The Forecaster (Portland, ME)

Novelists such as Ayn Rand (“The Fountainhead,” “Atlas Shrugged”) touted laissez-faire capitalism. The morality of individual (and corporate) self-interest – some would say “greed” – was said to be key to the nation’s wealth and economic growth.

….

The lessons of history seem clear: income/wealth inequality, and the cult of individual and corporate freedom in unregulated markets, does not produce sustained economic growth. Tax cuts do not produce economic growth. There is no “invisible hand” operating for the benefit of the larger society.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 07 Jul 2014
Sunday 06 July 2014
Negative
Tom Johnson, NewsBusters

…legions of 19-year-old frat boys (many of whom later won seats in Congress) who had their own selfishness validated as a profound philosophy by Atlas Shrugged.But culture created to serve ideology is never going to become just the culture, because by serving a political cause it almost inevitably…

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 06 Jul 2014
Saturday 05 July 2014
Negative
George Wolf, WNAX

Those pinhead libs in Hollywood are at it again! This time, they’ve got something called Snowpiercer, and are trying to distract us with simmering tension, a smart script and terrific action, but the hidden agenda is clearly just another unwarranted attack on our job creators!

Actually, the agenda is far from hidden, in fact, it might as well be a deadly-aimed snowball right to the face of John Galt.

And it is well done.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 05 Jul 2014
Friday 04 July 2014
Positive
Leslee Kulba, Tribune Papers (Asheville, NC)

In the early pages, I felt as if I was reading Atlas Shrugged without the love scenes. The so-called absurdities of power run-amok were not Rand’s inventions, but merely a fictitious portrayal of history repeating itself.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 04 Jul 2014
Negative
Adam Lee, Patheos

Rand expects her heroes to live by the same moral code in business as they do in their personal lives, so Dagny’s statement is clearly intended to be a general principle. She takes it for granted that in a capitalist utopia, every trade would benefit both parties. The reason she believes this is that in her worldview, it’s only the government, or some other illegitimate source of coercive power like a nagging wife, which can force a person to make a trade that disadvantages them. If there were no coercion and people were free to choose, then trades that weren’t mutually beneficial wouldn’t be made, and we’d all be better off.

This assertion showcases Ayn Rand’s almost childlike naivete about how her theories would play out in practice. Eliminating government as she wants wouldn’t decrease coercion at all. In fact, it would increase it.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 04 Jul 2014
Thursday 03 July 2014
Neutral
Beth Bragg, Alaska Dispatch News (Anchorage)

It was as if he bore the weight of the world on his sturdy shoulders – he was one of Alaska’s strongest mountain runners and the 2011 Mount Marathon champion, but somehow that wasn’t enough.

Then came last year, and this Alaskan Atlas shrugged off his burden.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 04 Jul 2014
Neutral
Stephen Littau, United Liberty

I stumbled across a book in the bookstore with a title that matched my attitude concerning most things: Ain’t Nobody’s Business if You Do! by Peter McWilliams.…

This book was by far the book that had the greatest impact on my thinking in terms of what role the government should have in people’s lives. There wasn’t a great deal of deep philosophical concepts as one would find in Human Action, Free to Choose, The Road to Serfdom, The Law, Atlas Shrugged, 1984, or any of the books libertarians are almost required to read.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 03 Jul 2014
Negative
Paul Waldman, The American Prospect

That doesn’t mean that popular culture written for a political purpose can’t have an impact; to see how it can, all you have to do is look at the endless legions of 19-year-old frat boys (many of whom later won seats in Congress) who had their own selfishness validated as a profound philosophy by Atlas Shrugged. But culture created to serve ideology is never going to become just the culture, because by serving a political cause it almost inevitably ghettoizes itself.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Jul 2014
Mixed
PBS

Ayn Rand, (1905-1982), was an American author and social critic. Her books serve mainly as a means of expressing her philosophies. Literary critics tend to see them as marred by a tendency to instruct the reader.

Rand’s best-known novels are THE FOUNTAINHEAD (1943) and ATLAS SHRUGGED (1957). Both present a moral and economic philosophy, called Objectivism, based on individualism and self-interest. These novels express the belief that original ideas are the main force in the world and that creative individuals deserve to profit from their ideas. The heroes represent disciplined, rational people of action who reject organized religion. In THE FOUNTAINHEAD, an architect destroys a housing project in which his ideas had been altered. In ATLAS SHRUGGED, one of the central characters calls a “mind strike,” during which all creative people withhold their ideas from the rest of the world. The strike reveals that society cannot exist without creative genius.

Rand was born in St. Petersburg, Russia. She moved to the United States in 1926 and became a U.S. citizen in 1931. Her novels WE THE LIVING (1936) and ANTHEm (1938) reflect her early life in Russia. Both novels express her revolt against socialist forms of government. Rand also wrote about her philosophies in such works of nonfiction as FOR THE NEW INTELLECTUAL (1961), THE VIRTUE OF SELFISHNESS (1964), and CAPITALISM, THE UNKNOWN IDEAL (1966).

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 29 Jun 2014
Negative
Dick Peterson, Brainerd Daily (MN)

…no-accountability indictments of the alleged lazy-poor could be straight out of atheist Ayn Rand’s “rational selfishness” economic philosophy playbook.

Among many Rand promoters we have current U.S. representatives, senators, and at least one Supreme Court justice. During his newsworthy individual filibuster Sen. Ted Cruz read long and loud from Rand’s novel, “Atlas Shrugged.” In this book the Rand oath is, “I swear by my life and my love of it that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.” It follows from this that such unappreciated self-reliant business-leader “makers” should not help the parasitic-lazy “takers.” An article in “Christianity Today” a few years ago labeled Rand the “Goddess (idolatrous cause) of the great (2008) recession.”

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Jul 2014
Wednesday 02 July 2014
Mixed
James Hamblin, The Atlantic Monthly

Self-described “lunatic-fringe disruptors” depict U.S. healthcare like one of Ayn Rand’s dystopias. The $2.7 trillion industry lacks accountability for exorbitant costs. The system incentivizes doctors (and hospitals) to do tests and procedures, instead of paying them to do their jobs—keeping people healthy. It’s like paying carpenters to use nails.

“I believe we are on the cusp of an oil rush—a fabulous revolution of profit-making and cost-saving in health care,” disruptor Jonathan Bush told a rapt audience at the Aspen Ideas Festival last week. In the Rand comparison, Bush might be John Galt—were he not exuding as much benevolence as relentless capitalism. And he’s not giving up on the system; he’s trying to upend it.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Jul 2014