Randex

Tuesday 03 June 2014

…of Chrysler’s creditors, Obamacare, etc. — the idea of running for office never crossed Ron Johnson’s mind. He was, however, dry tinder — he calls Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged” his “foundational book” — and now is ablaze, in an understated, upper-Midwestern way. This 55-year-old manufacturer of…

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 03 Jun 2014

…Coal, the world’s biggest, were quite bucked up to learn that they will continue to be 70% socialist. Better to be pink as a boiled lobster than a Randian capitalist, I guess. Koch brothers and legal advisor study Obama rules “Shares of Peabody Energy (BTU_), the world’s largest coal producer, were up…

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 03 Jun 2014
Sunday 01 June 2014

…publishing a list of the chemicals used to drill for natural gas using a technique known as hydraulic fracturing. I know, you have read “The Fountainhead” and are an Ayn Rand free-market capitalist opposing any “big-government regulation” because it will “destroy small business in America. Of course,…

Posted over 4 years ago Publication date: 01 Jun 2014
Saturday 29 June 2013
Negative
Steven M. Davidoff, New York Times - Dealbook

It’s easy to poke fun at the 210 principles as a latter-day model of EST or another 1970s personal discovery group. Take for example the notation in Principle 18 of “pain + reflection = progress,” the Christian-like maxim in Principle 122 to “teach your people to fish rather than give them fish” and the last principle, which lets you know something your mother told you: “Don’t try to please everyone.”

It is phrases like these that led a writer for New York magazine to describe the principles as “written in a digressive, self-serious style that reads as if Ayn Rand and Deepak Chopra had collaborated on a line of fortune cookies.”

It’s not all about personal attitude. Some of the principles express the harsh type of Darwinian capitalism that financiers tend to love.

Posted over 5 years ago Publication date: 04 Jun 2013
Friday 07 June 2013
Positive
Robert Vaughan, Robert Vaughan

…On May 6th, 2013 I interviewed Yaron Brook, Executive Director of the Ayn Rand Institute on the campus of the University of Toronto. Dr. Brook was in Toronto to speak on the morality of capitalism which is the focus of his…

Posted over 5 years ago Publication date: 07 Jun 2013
Thursday 06 June 2013
Positive
Art Carden, Library of Economics and Liberty - EconLog

Atlas Shrugged (again; warning: CONTAINS MINOR SPOILERS). I’m teaching what we call an “Oxbridge Tutorial” on the Moral Foundations of Capitalism in Spring 2014. This will be central to the course. I’ve been tinkering with an article on Atlas for years. After I finally finished The Brothers Karamazov and read Crime and Punishment about a year ago, I understand Rand-the-novelist a lot more. As for Rand-the-philosopher and Rand the thinker with a sound grasp of general equilibrium economics and public choice theory, I refer you to co-blogger Bryan Caplan’s excellent posts from 2005 (start here). There is much to like in Atlas, but there are two passages I find most gripping and most heartbreaking: the tunnel disaster and the death of the young man Rearden (non-)affectionately called “Non-Absolute.” Can you figure out why?

Posted over 5 years ago Publication date: 06 Jun 2013
Positive
Dolly A. Butz, Sioux City Journal (IA)

[Rebecca Rose] finished the “Hunger Games” trilogy and is currently reading late Russian-American philosopher and novelist Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged.” Rand’s fourth and final novel, published in the late 1950s, centers on a dystopian United States, where increased taxation and government regulations have forced its most productive citizens to disappear, leading industries to close and society to collapse. The book is based on Rand’s philosophy known as “Objectivism,” which asserts that reality exists independent of man’s consciousness.

Posted over 5 years ago Publication date: 06 Jun 2013
Negative
Alison Flood, The Guardian (London)

Authors “need editors and we need publishers and we need booksellers”, said Green, adding that he was not in the “widget-selling” or the “profit-maximisation” business. “I’m in the book business, the idea-sharing, consciousness-expanding, storytelling business,” said the novelist. “And I am not going to get out of that business. So fuck Ayn Rand and fuck any company that profits from peddling the lie of mere individualism. We built this together and we’re going to keep building it together.”

Posted over 5 years ago Publication date: 06 Jun 2013
Wednesday 05 June 2013
Neutral
Yves Smith, Naked Capitalism

Mechanism design theory was developed in parallel to Michael Jensen’s work that led to modern executive compensation. Jensen criticized existing executive compensation as paying CEOs as if they were “bureaucrats” and argued that it led CEOs to shirk effort and avoid taking productive risks. These variants of the classic “unfaithful agent” problem were reminiscent of Ayn Rand’s premise of the CEOs going on a mass strike, but here the strike was against the board of directors and the cause was their “inadequate” pay.

Posted over 5 years ago Publication date: 05 Jun 2013
Tuesday 04 June 2013
Positive
Watch List News

…of a series of six filmed before a live audience. Washington, D.C. (PRWEB) June 04, 2013 “‘Value’ is that which one acts to gain and keep,” wrote Ayn Rand, “'virtue’ is the action by which one gains and keeps it.” The Atlas Society has published another educational video on the major virtues: this…

Posted over 5 years ago Publication date: 04 Jun 2013
Negative
Sierra Salin, San Anselmo-Fairfax Patch

We need SOME rules and policy, to keep us from becoming both a “Randian” bunch of industrialists mistaking finite Natural systems for endless resources, and the demolicans and republicrats jabbering away…

Posted over 5 years ago Publication date: 03 Jun 2013
Negative
Paul Krugman, New York Times - The Conscience of a Liberal

We have a modern GOP in which Paul Ryan is considered a policy wonk, the leading intellectual among elected officials — and he gets his ideas about monetary policy by quoting from Atlas Shrugged.

Posted over 5 years ago Publication date: 04 Jun 2013