Randex

Friday 25 July 2014
Negative

Dear American Liberals: I understand why you really, really don’t like Paul Ryan.

After all, he was the Republican nominee for vice president. He’s an avowed acolyte of Ayn Rand, a progenitor of free market fundamentalism.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 25 Jul 2014
Negative
Reihan Salam, Slate
Paul Ryan  

If you’re a red-blooded American liberal who follows the news closely, you probably have a lot of preconceived notions about Ryan, the Wisconsin congressman and chairman of the House Budget Committee. You might think he’s a wild-eyed Ayn Rand devotee hell-bent on dismantling the safety net, and that the top action item on his daily planner is to give to the rich and take from the poor, like a cackling reverse Robin Hood.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 25 Jul 2014
Thursday 24 July 2014
Negative
Steve Benen, MSNBC - The MaddowBlog
Paul Ryan  

…of Ryan’s far-right ideology. The congressman and Ayn Rand fan “replaced his oft-drawn dichotomy between makers and takers, and the linked concepts of debt and dependency, with ‘the American Idea.’” And…

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 24 Jul 2014
Negative
The Anniston Star
Paul Ryan  

Brian Beutler writes:

You don’t need to love Representative Paul Ryan’s new plan to reform anti-poverty programs to admit that it’s an improvement over his old plan that entailed using increased suffering as an inducement to work. You also don’t need to love Paul Ryan’s new plan to reform anti-poverty programs to acknowledge that he’s left (or perhaps gotten himself excommunicated from) the cult of Ayn Rand.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 24 Jul 2014
Negative
Matt O'Brien, Washington Post
Paul Ryan  

Liberals are used to hating Rep. Paul Ryan.

And it’s not hard to see why. He’s an Ayn Rand fanboy who’s authored budget after budget that purportedly balances itself by cutting taxes for the rich and cutting spending for the poor even more - to almost comically low levels. Indeed, the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities calculates that 69 percent of his latest proposed cuts would come from programs that primarily serve low-and-moderate income households.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 24 Jul 2014
Negative
Steven Elbow, Cap Times (Madison, WI)
Paul Ryan  

…in the New Republic entitled, “Paul Ryan and Ayn Rand Just Got a Divorce.”“You don’t need to love Representative Paul Ryan’s new plan to reform anti-poverty programs to admit that it’s an…

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 24 Jul 2014
Negative
Brian Beutler, The New Republic
Paul Ryan  

Ryan would pay for this expansion by cutting other anti-poverty programs (Randian). But also by cutting mostly-unspecified corporate subsidies. He alludes to agriculture subsidies and clean-energy subsidies, but his rhetoric—"Energy companies also receive a number of subsidies"—is consistent with eliminating tax breaks for polluters (kind of Randian, kind of not Randian). This isn’t a tremendous departure for Ryan. His overall vision is still pretty radical. But inflexibility is a defining quality of Randism. There is no “mostly Randian.” As much as Ryan might prefer a narrative in which he didn’t leave objectivism but that objectivism left him, it doesn’t really work that way. And from the perspective of his critics, no longer being Randian isn’t a great boast, but it’s progress of a sort.

Posted almost 4 years ago Publication date: 24 Jul 2014
Wednesday 23 July 2014
Mixed

4. Rand’s work does get at a crucial truth that almost everyone misses

Again, as a Christian and as a conservative, I find Rand’s Objectivism, to use a word she so liked, despicable. But I still must recognize that Rand’s work emphasizes one crucial truth about the world that almost nobody else does: Free enterprise is key to human flourishing, not just because it enables the most material prosperity, but because it encourages human creativity.

Most defenses of free market capitalism are typically made in a utilitarian lens; partly because it’s such an easy case to make and partly because that is the lens of most academic work in economics. And it is most certainly true that, yes, with some important caveats, the freer the markets, the more prosperous the polity.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 23 Jul 2014
Tuesday 22 July 2014
Negative
Ian Reifowitz, Huffington Post

Rather than openly divide Americans along lines of race (although the racist aspects of Randian conservatism, at least in practice, are clearly evident in the rhetoric of “takers vs. makers”), this hyper-individualism peddles the myth that success and…

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 22 Jul 2014
Monday 21 July 2014
Negative
C.A. Pinkham, Kitchenette

Such is the callous, terrible legacy of Objectivism, which would be the world’s most laughably inept socio-economic philosophy if not for the horrifying fact that there are people who think it would actually work, many of whom are among the most prominent names in Congress.

Every part of the wealth = worth philosophy is inherently a selfish paean to one’s own pathos, but not just in the obvious ways. The real reason people believe it is that they can’t confront the fact that the game is rigged from the word go.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 21 Jul 2014
Friday 18 July 2014
Negative
Charles P. Pierce, Esquire - The Politics Blog
Paul Ryan  

… confronted Paul Ryan, the zombie-eyed granny starver from the state of Wisconsin, in the vice-presidential debate in 2012, and Ryan started doing his earnest I-Had-Ayn-Rand-In-Preschool student government bit, and Biden simply threw up his hands and laughed.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 18 Jul 2014
Neutral
Paul Ryan  

[KM:] But we still have people like Marsha Blackburn or Rick Perry arguing that they won’t be beholden to “P.C.” values when it comes to support for marriage equality, for example.

[CK:] But look what’s happening in all of those scenarios. It’s killing these candidates. Ted Cruz is not going to win the presidency. If the GOP has any real hope to take a prominent part in the political process outside of this obstructionism, then they are going to have to accept that some of these ideas are utterly unpopular.

Who would you say is the most successful reactionary political figure?

[KM:] Well there are mainstream guys like Paul Ryan who people take seriously, and Ted Cruz and Ben Carson are regularly floated as 2016 contenders.

[CK:] If the most successful reactionary candidate is Paul Ryan because he read Ayn Rand, that is a very different portrait than the most far right person in 1992 or 1976. That has changed.

Whereas many of the people who have been perceived as on the fringe of the left in the 1970s would now be viewed as mainstream. Jerry Brown promoting marijuana seemed crazy. Now it’s becoming a consensus. In 10 years, marijuana will be legalized in most of the states.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 18 Jul 2014