Randex

Wednesday 16 July 2014
Negative
Heath Shive, News-Sentinel (Fort Wayne, IN)

I say be selfish! And be a patriot! Because selfishness, as any 2-year-old will tell you, is just the way of our world. It’s instinctual. Shoot, Ayn Rand made selfishness a god and called it “objectivisim.” Tolerance can’t compete with that.So, onward with secession! Not only should Indiana secede from this Union, but Allen County should secede from Indiana.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 16 Jul 2014
Negative
Andy Metzger, WWLP (Chicopee, MA)

The prosecution makes everyone seem like a character in an Ayn Rand story, Sinnis said. “It was not corrupt. It was frankly human decency. It’s what it means to be part of a society,” Sinnis said. He said, “You help the people you care about. And there’s nothing revolutionary and nothing criminal about that.”

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 16 Jul 2014
Negative
Jason Brennan, Bleeding Heart Libertarians

Do Objectivists actually believe all non-Objectivist philosophers are stupid and evil?

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 16 Jul 2014
Positive
Dick Morris, dickmorris.com

I recently decided to read Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand. As a liberal, I had never considered it and as a conservative, never gotten around to it. Last night, I read an eloquent statement by Dr. Hendricks, a character in the novel who was on strike and refused to donate his services to State run medicine. It is worth pondering today. It echoes the cri de coeur of every doctor in America…

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 15 Jul 2014
Monday 14 July 2014
Mixed
Lois Parshley, Popular Science

For Domenico, his technologist’s outlook meshes well with Ayn Rand’s argument that individuals should act in their own self-interest, unbounded by government. “I’ve asked myself why this is such a technology-heavy crowd. The number of software engineers is off the charts,” he says. “When you think about things from a cause-and-effect vantage point, you see, wow, this [mainstream government] isn’t working out the way it’s supposed to.”

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 14 Jul 2014
Thursday 10 July 2014
Neutral
Zachary Heltzel, State Press (AZ State U)

By the end, the moral dilemmas faced by the film’s intensely likable protagonists as well as its comically evil villains have disturbing implications. Virtue proves to be as damaging as malice; humanitarianism reaps many of the same outcomes as Ayn Randian selfishness, as if the film’s titular train did not call back enough to “Atlas Shrugged” already.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 10 Jul 2014
Negative
Jonathan Chait, New York Magazine

s Paul Ryan an earnest, fiscally responsible wonk looking to make government more efficient, or an Ayn Rand–influenced ideologue determined to stop government from taking rich people’s money? This has been a long-standing debate between people like me and Ryan’s admirers in the political press corps. It is also a question of long-standing debate with Ryan defenders on the center-right like Ross Douthat, who once again defends his faith in Ryan’s hidden, subtextual, implied, or yet to fully emerge pragmatic impulses. Since Douthat likewise takes another opportunity to eye-roll my more direct, text-based reading of Ryan’s ideology (“a Randian Ryan or an apocalyptic Ryan or any other interpretation of his record Chait prefers”), the time seems right to summarize the evidence for my case.

So, here are seven things Paul Ryan has done that suggest Ayn Rand has influenced him…

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 10 Jul 2014
Positive
Brian Doherty, Reason

September, the producers of Atlas Shrugged Part III: Who Is John Galt? launched a Kickstarter campaign that ended up raising $446,000 to help fund the final installment of the film adaptation of Ayn Rand’s 1957 novel about a world driven to the brink of collapse by
overweening redistributionist government. The predictable response was cheap jokes from people whose (mis)understanding of Rand only went as far as: “She’s that scary chick who valorizes businessmen and the market.” Detractors assumed that asking people to freely
support something they valued was altruistic and therefore un-Randian.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 10 Jul 2014
Monday 07 July 2014
Negative
Orlando Delogu, The Forecaster (Portland, ME)

Novelists such as Ayn Rand (“The Fountainhead,” “Atlas Shrugged”) touted laissez-faire capitalism. The morality of individual (and corporate) self-interest – some would say “greed” – was said to be key to the nation’s wealth and economic growth.

….

The lessons of history seem clear: income/wealth inequality, and the cult of individual and corporate freedom in unregulated markets, does not produce sustained economic growth. Tax cuts do not produce economic growth. There is no “invisible hand” operating for the benefit of the larger society.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 07 Jul 2014
Sunday 06 July 2014
Negative
Tom Johnson, NewsBusters

…legions of 19-year-old frat boys (many of whom later won seats in Congress) who had their own selfishness validated as a profound philosophy by Atlas Shrugged.But culture created to serve ideology is never going to become just the culture, because by serving a political cause it almost inevitably…

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 06 Jul 2014
Thursday 03 July 2014
Negative
Paul Waldman, The American Prospect

That doesn’t mean that popular culture written for a political purpose can’t have an impact; to see how it can, all you have to do is look at the endless legions of 19-year-old frat boys (many of whom later won seats in Congress) who had their own selfishness validated as a profound philosophy by Atlas Shrugged. But culture created to serve ideology is never going to become just the culture, because by serving a political cause it almost inevitably ghettoizes itself.

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 02 Jul 2014
Mixed
PBS

Ayn Rand, (1905-1982), was an American author and social critic. Her books serve mainly as a means of expressing her philosophies. Literary critics tend to see them as marred by a tendency to instruct the reader.

Rand’s best-known novels are THE FOUNTAINHEAD (1943) and ATLAS SHRUGGED (1957). Both present a moral and economic philosophy, called Objectivism, based on individualism and self-interest. These novels express the belief that original ideas are the main force in the world and that creative individuals deserve to profit from their ideas. The heroes represent disciplined, rational people of action who reject organized religion. In THE FOUNTAINHEAD, an architect destroys a housing project in which his ideas had been altered. In ATLAS SHRUGGED, one of the central characters calls a “mind strike,” during which all creative people withhold their ideas from the rest of the world. The strike reveals that society cannot exist without creative genius.

Rand was born in St. Petersburg, Russia. She moved to the United States in 1926 and became a U.S. citizen in 1931. Her novels WE THE LIVING (1936) and ANTHEm (1938) reflect her early life in Russia. Both novels express her revolt against socialist forms of government. Rand also wrote about her philosophies in such works of nonfiction as FOR THE NEW INTELLECTUAL (1961), THE VIRTUE OF SELFISHNESS (1964), and CAPITALISM, THE UNKNOWN IDEAL (1966).

Posted about 4 years ago Publication date: 29 Jun 2014