Randex

Friday 16 January 2015
Mia De Graaf, Daily Mail (London)

‘I would give the greatest sunset in the world for one sight of New York’s skyline,’ Ayn Rand gushed in The Fountainhead.
With these breathtaking photographs, she won’t be the only one.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 16 Jan 2015
Thursday 15 January 2015
Alex Balk, The Awl

…modeler, referred incorrectly to the novels of Ayn Rand in describing Mr. Tucker. As a former architect, Mr. Tucker is more like the character Howard Roark, an architect, in ‘The Fountainhead’ — not…

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 15 Jan 2015
Jarry Lee, BuzzFeed

So I decided to create a Tinder profile and reply to matches exclusively with Ayn Rand quotes to see how they’d react.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 15 Jan 2015
New York Times

An article last Thursday about Adam Reed Tucker, a professional Lego modeler, referred incorrectly to the novels of Ayn Rand in describing Mr. Tucker. As a former architect, Mr. Tucker is more like the character Howard Roark, an architect, in “The Fountainhead” — not John Galt, a character in “Atlas Shrugged” who was not an architect.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 15 Jan 2015
Wednesday 14 January 2015
West Seneca Bee (NY)

Board members work hard, with the best interests of the town in mind. Many thankless hours are spent behind the scenes poring over documents, some resembling Ayn Rand’s “The Fountainhead” in density, all to make the best choices for those they serve.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 15 Jan 2015
India Today

Naina Lal Kidwai, CEO and country head, HSBC India tells us about books that changed her life.… The last novel written by Rand, Atlas Shrugged depicts the different ways in which capitalism, industry and government coercion can oppress the human mind and spirit. Rand also uses the book to further elaborate on her philosophy of Objectivism.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 14 Jan 2015
Tuesday 13 January 2015
Evening Standard (London)

Culture Secretary Sajid Javid might not be so hot on philosophers’ texts but he’s crazy about their films. He was introducing The Fountainhead, based on the Ayn Rand book, at Westminster’s Policy Exchange last night, as part of the debut screening of the Crossbench Film Society. Javid said he first saw the 1949 film — a comically didactic ode to libertarianism — as a child and it so inspired him that years later “when I was at university courting my future wife, I pulled the book down and said ‘Let me read you something amazing!’ What a geek! And she still married me!”

We asked Javid if he saw any similarity between the film’s villainous newspaper magnate and, say, Rupert Murdoch. “No. Not at all,” said the minister, hurriedly.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 13 Jan 2015
Peter Hoskin, ConservativeHome

It’s not often you’re served popcorn and pick ‘n’ mix sweets at a Westminster event, but last night was an exception. For last night saw the launch of my new film society, kindly hosted by Policy Exchange. It’s called the Crossbench Film Society, and most of the idea is captured in the name. Each month, a different politician chooses and introduces a different film for our collective delectation.

The first guest was the Conservatives’ own Sajid Javid – and his selection sure pulled at the old optic nerves. It was King Vidor’s 1949 adaptation of Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 13 Jan 2015
Monday 12 January 2015
Yahoo Finance

On January 21, 2015, Flemming Rose, the editor who published those cartoons and the author of The Tyranny of Silence: How One Cartoon Ignited A Global Debate on the Future of Free Speech, will speak on a panel about this all important topic.

Joining him will be Dr. Onkar Ghate, a Senior Fellow at the Ayn Rand Institute, and Harvey Silverglate, chairman of the board of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education and a lawyer affiliated with the ACLU for many years.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 12 Jan 2015
David Blackman, Building Design

Ever since Ayn Rand made an architect the hero of “The Fountainhead”, her paean to individualism, the profession has struggled to shrug off an image of control freakery. But then, it is understandable that architects don’t want to see their design…

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 12 Jan 2015
Thursday 08 January 2015
Mike Wilson, The Australian

WHEN I was a young man arguing lofty ideals in dim-lit coffee shops, I discovered Ayn Rand. First I saw a late night movie, The Fountainhead, with Gary Cooper. I was captivated by “the philosophy of objectivism’’. I found the paperback and read it. Next was Atlas Shrugged. I wondered, “Would I live long enough to see society crumble”, as depicted by the author? Bill Shorten, you have made my nightmare a reality.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 09 Jan 2015
Wednesday 07 January 2015
Steven Kurutz, New York Times

Mr. Tucker, 43, was once a practicing architect, but when the financial crisis hit and his business dried up, he became the Howard Roark of Legos. Now he builds scale models of world-famous skyscrapers and creates structures for corporate clients like Snap-on Tools and eBay. … Correction: January 8, 2015
An earlier version of this article referred incorrectly to the novels of Ayn Rand in describing Adam Reed Tucker. As a former architect, Mr. Tucker is more like the character Howard Roark, an architect, in “The Fountainhead,” not John Galt, a character in “Atlas Shrugged” who was not an architect.

Posted over 3 years ago Publication date: 07 Jan 2015